I Bought Seeds

Now that the greenhouse has been erected and bolted down it’s time to begin using it.

We eliminated four 4'by4' squares to accommodate the 6' by 6' greenhouse.
We eliminated four 4’by4′ squares to accommodate the 6′ by 6′ greenhouse.

We did our research on early spring crops and came up with the following:

The garden in July, 2016.
The garden in July, 2016.

Radishes and peas — sow directly outdoors.

We've had great success in the past with radishes but not so much with peas.
We’ve had great success in the past with radishes but not so much with peas.

The peas will have their own square but I suggested to Charlie that the radishes be planted around exterior of the greenhouse since they grown quickly and look attractive.

We haven't grown Swiss chard for a few years. It's the red plant in the garden of 2010.
We haven’t grown Swiss chard for a few years. It’s the red plant in the garden of 2010.

Lettuce, Swiss chard — start indoors.

Both lettuce and Swiss chard are planted 4 per square foot so one 4′ by 4′ square would accommodate 64 plants. That’s a lot of seed starting.

Here is the garden plan viewed from a similar angle as the photo above.
Here is the garden plan viewed from a similar angle as the first photo above.

We number the garden squares from the driveway side since that is the actual entrance.  Now that 4 squares have been removed we might have to come up with another numbering scheme.

Looking forward to a fence of sunflowers.
Looking forward to a fence of sunflowers.

I bought myself some Lemon Queen sunflower seeds which I personally am going to plant earlier this year than I did last year. I may even start them inside.

Hoping to plant in the near future.

What’s your favorite crop?

List 2017: February Plans

February is my favorite month probably because it’s my birth month and it’s short and it bridges the gap between winter and spring.

The Lion King and Wicked are definitely on our list.
The Lion King and Wicked are definitely on our list.

This February we already have plans for a long weekend in NYC with the express intention of seeing maximum Broadway and off-Broadway shows and possible a cabaret. (This is item #53 from my 101 in 1001.)

The light in question is at the bottom of the eave on the right.
The light in question is at the bottom of the eave on the right.

I also want to align our outdoor flood light so it comes on when someone pulls into the driveway.  It became misaligned while we were painting the house in 2015. Unfortunately we have to pull out the big extension ladder to reach it. Time to be seen again without having to walk in the mud and wave my hands like an idiot.

We have pulled the tile we want to utilize for backsplashes.
We have pulled the tile we want to utilize for backsplashes.

I’m still waiting for a proposal from our tile guy. He said he was a month out when we spoke in January so I hope his crew will start and finish in February.

Trim in the hall ready to be measured, cut, and applied.
Trim in the hall ready to be measured, cut, and applied.

Charlie is trying to install the baseboard trim that has been filling our upstairs hallway for months now.  He complains that he can’t access the other upstairs rooms yet has been dragging his feet on this project. Hoping this will get top priority while I’m at my day job.

The stair runner to the second floor has never been finished.
The stair runner to the second floor has never been finished.

I have 2 personal projects set to start this weekend that only I can do.  More details later.

What’s your favorite month?

January’s the Time to . . .

.  .  .  do things that need getting done.

Taking down the Christmas decorations is a priority early in January.
Taking down the Christmas decorations is a priority early in January.

This year I had no real plan for January — no to-do list yet we accomplished quite a bit.

Charlie's 6' by 6' greenhouse.
Charlie’s 6′ by 6′ greenhouse.

Charlie received a greenhouse kit for Christmas which took us about the entire month to put together. (Greenhouse 1, Greenhouse 2, Greenhouse 3, Greenhouse Final.)

Before: Offsite Project
Before: Offsite Project
After: Offsite Project
After: Offsite Project

In our defense we took two weeks out to brighten a friend’s pad. (Offsite 2, Offsite 3, 4, 5, Offsite 6 and Finale.)

New curtains in the living room.
New curtains in the living room.

I found some items I’ve been searching for including a new mirror, new curtains, and a new duvet cover.

I'm still looking for a vanity stool for my dressing table.
I’m still looking for a vanity stool for my dressing table.

In addition to hanging the mirror I also put up some art in the master suite.

We had the meeting now we need a contract.
Marble 2″ by 4″ tile in the master bathroom.

I contacted our tile setter to get a price and time for installing backsplashes.  Charlie lugged out leftover tile up from the basement to make sure we would have enough for the project.

The Glade consists of a house and a cottage.
The Glade consists of a house and a cottage (left).

So even without a formal, blog-driven task list we, the merry threesome who live at The Glade, got a fair bit accomplished.

Last February we were having 2 tea parties.
Last February we were having 2 tea parties.

As for February we already have some ideas in the works. Big ideas!

What’s on your list?

Greenhouse Installation: The Build — Final

Since we finished constructing the greenhouse the only thing remaining was to anchor it to a level foundation. (Part 1.)

The door was easily installed.
The finished greenhouse structure.

Charlie spent a fair bit of time putting the precisely cut 6′ by 6′ foundation in place with 2-foot rebar anchors.

The foundation is almost in place.
The foundation is almost in place.

Charlie was careful to square (by taking diagonal measurements) and level the foundation lumber so the greenhouse would sit straight thus allowing the door and window to work properly.

Weed-control ground cloth covers corrugated cardboard and is anchored by foundation timbers.
Weed-control ground cloth covers corrugated cardboard and is anchored by foundation timbers.

Before driving the rebar into the ground he laid some large cardboard pieces (to help control the dirt) under 2 layers of weed barrier ground cloth inside the perimeter.  The foundation timbers hold down the perimeter of the fabric.

The greenhouse is constructed of aluminum and polycarbonate sheets which makes it strong but lightweight.
The greenhouse is constructed of aluminum and polycarbonate sheets which makes it strong but lightweight.

Two adults carried the completed greenhouse across the yard (about 20 feet) and four adults easily lifted onto the redwood foundation.

The greenhouse was blown off its foundation even with logs holding it down.
The greenhouse was blown off its foundation even with logs holding it down.

We left the greenhouse on but not connected to the foundation and it was blown sideways by the wind.

We pre-drilled the holes for 6-inch hex-head lag screws then ratcheted them into place.
We pre-drilled the holes for 6-inch hex-head lag screws then ratcheted them into place.

Even though the foundation is held in place by two-foot rebar stakes the foundation corners are held together by 3/8-inch by 6-inch lag screws — one per corner.

Holes were pre-drilled in the base of the greenhouse which we marked and drilled into the foundation. Then we put the greenhouse back in place and screwed it down.
Holes were pre-drilled in the base of the greenhouse which we marked and drilled into the foundation. Then we put the greenhouse back in place and screwed it down.

The greenhouse is very susceptible to being displaced due to winds so it was attached to the foundation by 24 quarter-inch by two-inch lag screws with a washer between the hex head and the wood.

The area around the greenhouse will need some grading.
The area around the greenhouse will need some grading.

As Charlie upgrades the interior for planting we’ll have some information on what works (or doesn’t work) for him.

The greenhouse viewed from the front of the potager.
The greenhouse viewed from the front of the potager.
View from the 2nd story of the house.
View from the 2nd story of the house.

Are you planning your garden already?

Greenhouse Installation: The Build — Part 3

Another rainy Sunday so naturally we worked outside and finished putting the greenhouse together. (Part 1 and Part 2.)

This turns out to have been the easy part of the project.
This turns out to have been the easy part of the project.

The basic wall structure had been built for a few weeks then we worked on an offsite projects for a couple of weeks.

This end was assembled in the house.
This end was assembled in the house.

We built the front gable inside the house but it was difficult to keep together until it was installed.

The front gable had various pieces that kept falling apart until the bolts were all tightened.
The front gable had various pieces that kept falling apart until the bolts were all tightened.

Setting the front gable end was fairly tricky and took at least 2 sets of hands.

The front and back were tied together with a ridge pole.
The front and back were tied together with a ridge pole.

The back gable and the roof ridge were more straightforward.

The door was easily installed.
The door was easily installed.

The window and door had already been assembled and also fit into the finished building very easily.

Charlie looks forward to using his greenhouse.
Charlie looks forward to using his greenhouse.

Charlie is waiting for a fair day to finish setting the foundation onto which the greenhouse will be connected.

The foundation is almost in place.
The foundation is almost in place.

Soon I hope.

Do you alternate your projects or work straight through from beginning to end of a single task?

Greenhouse Installation: The Build — Part 2

Yesterday was a nice warm winter day — 65 degrees.

The space allotted for the new 6' by 6' greenhouse.
The space allotted for the new 6′ by 6′ greenhouse.

Charlie worked on the foundation for the greenhouse.

Four 8-foot long cedar posts
Four 8-foot long cedar posts

The weed barrier ground cloth had been delivered in a 3-foot by 50-foot roll. And the redwood lumber arrived via UPS all the way from California. The package of wood weighed 84 pounds so the UPS driver helped Charlie carry it to the garden.

The outside measurement of the wood foundation is slightly bigger than the 72-1/2 inch outside greenhouse measurement.
The outside measurement of the wood foundation is slightly bigger than the 72-1/2 inch outside greenhouse measurement.

I cut the wood with our miter saw it so it would create a 6-foot square at the centerline of the 4 by 4 (actually 3-11/16″ square) posts. Two long posts were cut to 75-1/2″ and the shorter posts 75-1/2″ less 7-3/8″.

The interior perimeter, like the exterior perimeter, has about an inch and a half border.
The interior perimeter, like the exterior perimeter, has about an inch and a half border.

We were careful to allow the border around the outside and the border around the inside to be approximately equal.

half-inch by 2-foot rebar
Half-inch by 2-foot rebar

The next step is to put the wood foundation in place and tie it down with rebar.

An interior corner.
An interior corner temporarily fitted together.

We’re waiting for another nice day to finish.

Have you started a project that takes more than one step? Are you stuck?

Digging for a View

Quite awhile ago we took on a huge pile of wood chips from dead oak tree removal.

Chips from our trees.
Chips from our trees.

They were dumped in the driveway in front of the Cottage.

Chips are an easy and economical way to neaten up the garden and discourage weed growth.
Chips are an easy and economical way to neaten up the garden and discourage weed growth.

Charlie loves having chips available to groom paths in the garden and yard.

The chip pile was directly outside the Cottage door and most of the view from the window.
The chip pile was directly outside the Cottage door and most of the view from the window.

However we have not used all the chips yet and they do obscure the sylvan view from the Cottage.

The pile of chips also took up about 2 parking spaces.
The pile of chips also took up about 2 parking spaces.

Our tenant decided she would like to move the pile out of her line of sight which was fine with Charlie and me.

Only a pile of crushed stone remains which is slated to be spread on the driveway.
Only a pile of crushed stone remains which is slated to be spread on the driveway.

In 2 days she shoveled the pile down to nothing and moved it by wheelbarrow to a discreet place in the back yard.

Can you picture it yet?
Can you picture it yet?

No doubt when the greenhouse is set in place we’ll use some of the chips to landscape around the tiny building.

Are you working or playing outside on pleasant winter days?