Making Use of Old Wood

A few years ago Charlie took apart an old fence that a neighbor was having replaced.  He (we) salvaged the wood because I was intending to use it to rebuild our fence which had been knocked down by a fallen tree.

Once upon a time The Glade was fenced in.
Once upon a time The Glade was fenced in.

Over the years we have not (yet?) rebuilt the fence but the salvaged wood has been used to make raised garden beds, Easter signs, garden stakes, etc. The remainder lives near our woodshed in a mighty heap.

The salvage wood pile needs an overhaul.
The salvage wood pile needs an overhaul.

I asked Charlie to pull out some pieces for me (I’m not climbing in there) so I could make 2 planters for the front of the potager. Unfortunately there was wood enough for only one but I made it as a prototype since I was using plans from Ana White’s blog but intended to change them a little.

I just need to fasten down the top trim.
I just need to fasten down the top trim.

I basically built a planter all by myself in one morning using my new tools.  It takes a super-strong person, however, to move it so naturally I asked Charlie to take it outside for me.  I wanted to put the boxwood in it but proportionately this planter is waaayy toooooo biiiggg, instead it’s just perfect for a small (olive) tree.

The  removable bottom needs to be lowered for the olive trees.
The removable bottom needs to be lowered for the olive trees.

I still intend to build 2 planters for the front of  the potager but they will be smaller. I like the way this one looks and I’ll use it as a model.

The boxwood on either side of the gate would look good in planters.
The boxwood on either side of the gate would look good in planters.

Step-by-step on this salvage planter tomorrow.

What do you oversize?

Odds and Ends

I didn’t get much accomplished yesterday, just a few odds and ends.

Window # 10
Window # 10 scraped.

Actually nothing was finished but I did start a few things.

Window #10's trim has been painted and is checked off.
Window #10’s trim has been painted and is checked off.

I gave two coats of paint to the trim on window #10 and the double window.

The double window in the back of the house has been trim painted.
The double window in the back of the house has been trim painted.

While I was working on window #10 I decided I would also wash the window.  When I went to clean the inside of the storm window I wanted to lower the top sash of the inside window which then dropped really fast and smashed my thumb between the two sashes.  No photos since I soaked my poor, sore, bleeding thumb in a glass of ice water. I’m guessing that the counterweight (inside the wall) has come loose from the upper sash which makes opening this particular window very perilous.

We know this is window #10 by the small brass brad on the lower corner of the trim.
We know this is window #10 by the small brass brad on the lower corner of the trim.

I also removed, scrubbed, rinsed, and replaced the screen.

The screen was removed for easy cleaning.
The screen was removed for easy cleaning.

As I was admiring my paint job Charlie and I started talking about how the front yard is going to change.

This section of fence might impede the excavation for the renovation.
This section of fence might impede the excavation for the renovation.

For one thing the brick path is being removed and the new centrally located porch will come out into the yard more than the current one.

The new porch comes out from the house just shy of 5 feet.
The new porch comes out from the house just shy of 5 feet.

I think the lamp post will stay where it is but I took a saw to a section of the fence.

I sawed thought the rails with a hand saw.  Someone stronger will have to remove the post.
I sawed through the rails with a hand saw. Someone stronger will have to remove the post.

I also drew some rough plans for the kitchen island which I developed from a design on Ana White’s blog.  I’m not quite ready to build yet but I do know I’ll need a power miter saw and a Kreg jig.

I want one of these.
I want one of these.

Any recommendations for a miter saw?

Garden Weekend

Weatherwise this past weekend was perfect.

Looking across the potager from the driveway.
Looking across the potager from the driveway.

Charlie transplanted his tomato seedlings in larger pots and he prepared a couple of squares.

The 4 foot by 4 foot squares are topped with compost and marked into 1 foot by 1 foot squares.
The 4 foot by 4 foot squares are topped with compost and marked into 1 foot by 1 foot squares.

In the squares that hold last year’s parsley he planted beets and radishes.

The spring planting is progressing.
The spring planting is progressing.

Best of all (for me) is that he weeded and mulched the entrance to the potager.

The boxwood on either side of the gate were actually rooting into the soil below the pots.  I'm looking forward to some square planters for these.
The boxwood on either side of the gate were actually rooting into the soil below the pots. I’m looking forward to some square planters for these.

Oh, it looks so nice.

Charlie put the garden sign (the one like his grandmother's) in the entrance.
Charlie put the garden sign (the one like his grandmother’s) in the entrance.

How many photos can I show you?

Once the garden is in the wee little house will barely be visible.
On the corner facing the camera is a cement frog.

Compare the next picture to the one at the top of this post.

This is the vista of the yard from the entrance to our kitchen garden.
This is the vista of the yard from the entrance to our kitchen garden.

Wow, I could just sit around and look at it all day.

Where’s your sweet spot?

I’m linked to
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Setting Up the Fence

With the old iron fence derusted, primed, and  painted it was time to set it up at the entrance to the potager.

Our now-demolished porch had an iron fence around it.
Our now-demolished porch had an iron fence around it.

First we strung a line between 2 stakes so we could keep a straight line with the fence which comes in sections.

Charlie measured the centerline (after eyeballing its position) to make sure he still "had IT!"
Charlie measured the centerline (after eyeballing its position) to make sure he still “had IT!”

Then Charlie cleaned out any old dirt and concrete that was wedged in the hollow fence posts.

The bottom of the fence posts were filled with dirt and cement.
The bottom of the fence posts were filled with dirt and cement.

Next he pounded 2-foot rebar into the ground until about 8 inches showed above ground.

Two feet of rebar was pounded into the ground until 8 inches remains above ground.
Two feet of rebar was pounded into the ground until 8 inches remains above ground.

The we carefully lifted the fence onto the rebar.

A section of fence and the gate.
A section of fence and the gate.

It seems to be sturdy.

Looking through the fence from the potager toward The Cottage.
Looking through the fence from the potager toward The Cottage.

I can’t wait until the plants start to grow and the blue fence sits among variegated greenery.

The blue is subtle but distinctive.
The blue is subtle but distinctive.

And because we never know when to quit we’re thinking of this:

We have a longer to add to both sides.
We have 2 longer pieces to add to either side.

Crazy, huh?

What are you waiting for?

I Decided to Use Blue

I told you here we were planning to use the fence from our demolished porch as the entrance to the potager.

We have a good expanse of old iron fence to use at the kitchen garden entrance.
We have a good expanse of old iron fence to use at the kitchen garden entrance.

First Charlie derusted it with wire brushes on an electric drill.

We have a variety of drill attachments to clean metal.
We have a variety of drill attachments to clean metal.

Then I gave it a coat of Rust Reformer by Rustoleum.

The rusty iron fence before and then derusted and sprayed with Rust Reformer.
The rusty iron fence before and then derusted and sprayed with Rust Reformer.

The Rust Reformer goes on matte black.

The rust inhibitor was sprayed over the derusted fence.
The rust inhibitor was sprayed over the derusted fence.

After that 2 coats of Rustoleum Gloss Protective Enamel in Navy.

Ultimately I decided to paint the fence gloss navy blue.
Ultimately I decided to paint the fence gloss navy blue.

I really love how it’s turning out.

Do you reuse things? Like what?

When Cost is the Object

We’ve been working on our old iron fence here  so we could use it as the entrance gate to our potager.

The potager needs a proper entrance.
The potager needs a proper entrance.

In order to make it stand firmly we needed something to hold the hollow metal standards in the ground.

The fence posts are hollow.
The fence posts are hollow.

First we went to Home Depot to buy a length of 3/8 inch pipe but it cost almost $20 so that was not going to work for me.

Then as we were driving down the boulevard we remembered our friend’s   automotive yard. (One man’s clutter is another man’s business.)

Lots of diverse items populate this yard.
Lots of diverse items populate this yard.

He was there trying to make a transaction about a big rig when we drove up.  Charlie asked if he had any old pipe lying around and told him the purpose.

An old piece of rebar cut into 2-foot lengths would solve our dilemma.
An old piece of rebar cut into 2-foot lengths would solve our dilemma.

He had a piece of rebar which he cut into 2-foot pieces with his torch.

A torch sends off sparks and handily cuts the rebar.
A torch sends off sparks and handily cuts the rebar.

Charlie cooled the hot ends in some water that had collected in a tire.

The hot ends of the rebar were cooled in water collected in an old truck tire.
The hot ends of the rebar were cooled in water collected in an old truck tire.

For $5 we took the custom cut rebar home to  see if it would work for setting up the fence.

Do your projects have a cost limit? Or do you spend like Martha Stewart?

English Hurdle Fence

I’ve spent the past couple of posts discussing the yard at The Glade and our plans. We’ve taken almost all the fencing down which used to delineate the property but I still like to see a good fence.
English Hurdle Fence

 The fields of the property I visited a few weeks ago are entirely enclosed in English Hurdle Fence made at a local sawmill.

English hurdle fence used to hold livestock.

 This is a delicate, moveable, distinctive fence which originated in England and is sometimes made in willow or hazel. The idea of a hurdle is that it can be moved and so the fencing is sold in premade sections.

This fence really is distinctive.

Each section of this fence is pegged to the next with removable pegs.

This close-up shows how the sections of fence are pegged together.

 Sometimes the sections, while still pegged, ease themselves apart but the fence still stands.

English Hurdle Fence

 There’s a book which you can read online via www.archive.org at the Winterthur Museum Library called  English hurdle fence for use on farms, country places, breeding establishments, suburban homes and hunt clubs.

English Hurdle booklet can be read online.

 I thought you’d like to see it. It’s different and we don’t see English hurdle fence much anymore but I’d love to have some surrounding my yard. It needs very little upkeep.  I’ll probably end up with a live hedge of some sort. Maybe unclipped burning bush.

Do you have a fence or a hedge?  What’s it made of? Or do you prefer nothing at all to define the perimeter of your property?