A Door for the Laundry Room

Our laundry room is on the second floor of the house with a southern and western exposure.

The window above the porch roof on the side of the house and the proximate one on the front are in the laundry room.
The window above the porch roof on the side of the house and the proximate one on the front are in the laundry room. (The dryer vent is also visible on the front wall.)

In summer it’s hot due to its position .  .  .

The dryer on top of the washer is vented outside and allows cold drafts to come in when the dryer door is open.
The dryer on top of the washer is vented outside and allows cold drafts to come in when the dryer door is open.

the dryer .  .  .

Corner of laundry leading to the attic.
Corner of laundry leading to the attic.

and the door to the attic.

This window overlooks the front yard.
This window overlooks the front yard.

In winter it’s drafty for exactly the same reasons.

This solid wood door with 4 lights might fit the opening in the laundry room perfectly.
This solid wood door with 4 lights might fit the opening in the laundry room perfectly.

I think the door that used to go out to our back porch before we built the conservatory might fit the opening perfectly.

The doorway from inside the laundry room.
The doorway from inside the laundry room.

The main problem I can foresee is that the light switch will be behind the door when it’s open.

The door will block this view.
The door will block this view.

The benefit is that the second floor will stay warmer in winter and cooler in summer and laundry clutter will be hidden behind the solid bottom part of the door.

Have you ever tried hanging a door? Tips?

 

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Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

14 thoughts on “A Door for the Laundry Room”

  1. This is a DIY project? Because the Irishman built the jambs for my doors first. He temporarily attached the doors into the jambs so they could go in as one rigid unit. Then you have to fill the gaps around the jamb with shims and attach it to the wall. I’m sure you’ll find a better explanation on YouTube than I can give you in plain text, especially when I didn’t actually do this job myself.

    1. I was afraid we’d have to build jambs. Even our pros sent old doors out to be jambed at the lumber yard prior to installation. We’re brave. What can we do but fail? Jo

      1. No individual step is really hard. You might work slowly though. It’s up to you if you want to temporarily screw the door into the jamb and then unscrew it (or cut the nails or whatever) after the jamb is installed, or if you want to build the jamb, install it, then put the door up, and possibly have to adjust because you didn’t get it shimmed just the right amount all around.

      2. And as far as “what can we do but fail?” goes, I think you’re pretty safe. The worst that could happen is you break a pane of glass, or you install the door nailed into the jamb and then can’t remove the temporary attachments and one of you has to climb out the window. If you saw my post about plumbers (written as if it’s about plunging into a dysfunctional dating life), my dad and I did far, far worse than this trying to hook up my zoned radiator heating system and caused about $1500 of damage.

  2. Is there enough room for it to open into the hallway? This might be a little daunting, but you’ve tackled a lot of daunting things. Happy research.

    1. There’s enough room in the hall except the door opening has a return on one side that would prevent its opening altogether. It must open into the room. Jo

  3. Hmm. You are so smart that if you say it can’t open into the hall I know you are right. I’m not sure what you mean by return – I guess a projection in the hall that’s in the way. What about working with the hinges so it opens into the laundry room but with the opening on the side by the light switch? Good luck with this project!

    1. Can the light be changed to a motion sensitive light so it will come on when you come into the room so you don’t have to worry about the switch?

  4. Don’t know if you have room, but have you considered hanging it on a track outside the laundry room, barn door style? Then it doesn’t need to swing. They’re all the rage, but I never caught the bug until I saw a couple of salvaged doors hung that way in one of the floating homes we toured this summer. This one with its windows would look cool on a track!

    1. I thought about that and it would have to hang inside the room and we’d have to remove the large cabinet we just hung. But I’m not dismissing any possibility until I see it in place. Jo

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