Getting Rid of More Stuff

When my tenant put her new Ikea Ektorp sofa with chaise in the Cottage it reminded me of just how much I still need to remove.

The lounge can be put on either side or in the middle. (That's my headboard next to the sofa.)
The lounge can be put on either side or in the middle. (That’s my headboard next to the sofa.)

My goal for this weekend, if Hurricane Matthew doesn’t get in the way, is to remove our bed frame headboard and footboard which prevents the new sofa from being moved to the wall.

These doors have to be dispersed in the house because they're clogging up the corner in the Cottage.
These doors have to be dispersed in the house because they’re clogging up the corner in the Cottage.

I also want to move the doors from the corner near the door so the new cabinet can be put in.

The right section of fence is sold. I'm using the rest.
The right section of fence is sold. I’m using the rest.

I’ve been successful in getting rid of some things on Craigslist like the last section of porch railing from our demolished porch.

A man bought the blue screen door for his wife for $10. I had it listed for $5.
A man bought the blue screen door for his wife for $10. I had it listed for $5.

Also gone is the screen door .  A man’s wife sent him for it. I was selling it for $5; he bought it for $10.

This last bit ended up in a dumpster.
This last bit ended up in a dumpster.

The pile of scrap wood is gone – some to toy makers, some to the dumpster.

The drafting lamp was just taking up space.
The drafting lamp was just taking up space.

My draftsman lamp from college is gone.

My drafting table while bulky does fold to an almost flat disposition.
My drafting table while bulky does fold to an almost flat disposition.

I’m also planning to put my drafting table on Craigslist.  It makes me sad because I always thought I would need it again because I would go back to designing.  That seems unlikely.

Have you given up something you thought you’d always do?

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Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

9 thoughts on “Getting Rid of More Stuff”

  1. You’ve made good progress! I have two boxes in my trunk that I will be dropping off this morning, mostly clothes that I wore to work. Since I moved / retired 9 years ago I’ve never worn them. Hard to let them go but it’s definitely time.

  2. Just remember that getting rid of the drafting table does not mean you can never go back to designing. Should you ever want to you have means to buy another table. In the meantime, someone who will use it can take your current table.

  3. I like Jessica’s comment … but I also understand the sentimental value of your old table. I have a giant drafting table in the attic that I got from a neighbor. Someday, I swear, we will have an art room for it. My degree is in fine arts, and I’d love to get back to drawing and painting. I tell myself that’s what retirement’s for, and it’s not too far away!

  4. I hear you… my guest bed has been leaning against a wall in my bedroom since April because there’s too much junk for it in the basement. I held onto all the usable 120-year-old framing lumber I could knowing what Philadelphia Salvage charges for it… but unless I decide I want a really rough, splintery bathroom vanity, I don’t have any use for it.

    1. Once it’s gone you can’t get it back. I’m holding on to 70-year-old sheathing lumber with which I plan to build out the conservatory bathroom vanity and other details. Jo

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