Two Places I Can’t Recommend

Our last site to see in the Vegas area was Hoover Dam. It seemed we climbed and climbed (in a car) up the mountain until we got to the over look where you could see the dam. It was interesting but I wouldn’t make it a primary destination.

Our trek westward went from Las Vegas to Death Valley to Sequoia National Park
Our trek westward went from Las Vegas to Death Valley to Sequoia National Park

After Las Vegas, Charlie and I headed west toward Death Valley National Park in California.

The road sign says "Caution Extreme Heat Danger".
The road sign says “Caution Extreme Heat Danger”.

The plan was to see Death Valley in the morning and Sequoia National Park in the afternoon.

The terrain is diverse.
The terrain is diverse.

I don’t know if anyone could do all that driving but we couldn’t.

Borax mounds at Zabriski Point.
Borax mounds at Zabriski Point.

Death Valley is a diverse area known for its mountains and borax deposits.

If you zoom the picture you can see Charlie in the desert of Death Valley.
If you zoom the picture you can see Charlie in the desert of Death Valley.

It took us 5 boring long but interesting hours to drive through Death Valley.  I don’t recommend it.

The Sequoias were interesting to see but for me the ride to see them was horrifying.
The Sequoias were interesting to see but for me the ride to see them was horrifying.

After staying the night at a very pleasant AirBnb in a peach and plum fruit grove we headed to Sequoia National Park not to be confused with Sequoia National Forest and Sequoia National Monument. They are all approximately in the same area but the target destination is Sequoia National Park where the very large trees are located.

Charlie is standing at the base of a Sequoia tree for size reference.
Charlie is standing at the base of a Sequoia tree for size reference.

The drive to the park is a dizzying.  As we climbed to almost 8000 feet I was rewarded with a bad headache and extreme nausea that only subsided an hour and a half later when the car stopped.  Going back down the mountain was even worse.

A large Sequoia tree that had fallen is tall enough for a man to tunnel under.
A large Sequoia tree that had fallen is tall enough for a man to tunnel under.

The trees, however, were quite spectacular.  Glad I saw it, can’t recommend it.

Have you done something spectacular that you wouldn’t recommend?

Advertisements

Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

2 thoughts on “Two Places I Can’t Recommend”

  1. Some friends and I walked across the Hoover Dam at night while driving from Vegas to the Grand Canyon shortly after I graduated college. It was awe inspiring to be the that late with no one around, although there were vehicles driving past – mostly trucks. It was in January. I wished at the time that we could see the exhibit that is set up inside and obviously not open at night. I would like to go to Death Valley to see it.

    1. We rode high above Hoover Dam but I was in no position to walk so we took a few photos. Death Valley is interesting and probably would have been a better drive if we had returned to Las Vegas instead of driving all the way through. Jo

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s