Installing a New Rural Mailbox

The weather in Maryland this week is finally warm enough to work outside.  By the end of the week the temperature will be in the upper 70s!

Our old green mailbox is on the street on the west side of the house.
Our old green mailbox is on the street on the west side of the house.

We’ve been waiting for some nice weather to install the new mailbox my sister sent us for Christmas.

The "waiting mail" flag is sturdy.
The “waiting mail” flag is sturdy.

We accessed the installation instructions for our Whitehall mailbox and the U.S. Postal Service’s Guidelines on the internet

We have various bits of lumber left over from the renovation.
We have various bits of lumber left over from the renovation.

Charlie found a brand new 8-foot 4″ by 4″ pressure treated post in our leftover lumber from the renovation.

The wood post is securely in the ground.
The wood post is securely in the ground.

He dug a hole just past the driveway on the west side of the house and inserted the wood post.  The Post Office does not want it to be cemented in the ground just in case a vehicle hits it; the mailbox is supposed to give way in case of an accident.

On the first try the post was hammered too far into the ground.
On the first try the white metal post was hammered too far into the ground.

Then he covered the post with the decorative metal sleeve. After taking another look at the directions Charlie realized the mailbox actually sits in front of the post, not on it like our old mailbox, so he had to work the metal sleeve back out of the hole.

The metal sleeve is held to the wood post with 2 lag bolts.
The metal sleeve is held to the wood post with 2 lag bolts.

He screwed the metal post into the wooden post using the two predrilled holes at the back.

The brackets are the supports for the mailbox.
The brackets are the supports for the mailbox.

Two horizontal supports are held on by 2 screws each into the post.

The mailbox is sturdy and heavy and the requisite distant from both the road and the ground (I hope).
The mailbox is sturdy and heavy and the requisite distant from both the road and the ground (I hope).

The mailbox itself sits on the horizontal brackets and is screwed into those brackets.

The postal carrier used the new box with yesterday's mail.
The postal carrier used the new box with yesterday’s mail.

Lastly the address plates are screwed onto the sides of the mailbox from the inside.  All holes are sealed with a sealant provided with the box.

Our gleaming white mailbox is a welcome addition to The Glade.
Our gleaming white mailbox is a welcome addition to The Glade.

Finally Charlie removed the old mailbox but I ran out of memory (on my camera chip) before he was finished.

What are you upgrading?

Advertisements

Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

10 thoughts on “Installing a New Rural Mailbox”

  1. It looks great! As I was reading, I kept thinking about how you talk that your projects always get complicated. I think that is the nirm…even Charlie had some challenges! ☺

    1. My only role was to hold on the name plates while he was attaching them from inside the box. He’s more detail oriented than I which made this a perfect project for him due to the USPS rules and regs. Jo

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s