Considering the Unfinished Floors

Chad at Chad’s Crooked House is having his vintage floors refinished which got me thinking about our unfinished floors.

The conservatory floor is still uncovered sub-floor.
The conservatory floor is still uncovered sub-floor.

We have areas in the new additions that still need wood flooring.

There is a height difference between the bathroom floor and the subfloor which will increase once the tile is set.
There is a height difference between the bathroom floor and the subfloor which will increase once the tile is set.

Before laying the wood floors we are waiting for the bathrooms to be tiled so we can make as seamless a transition as possible between the old parts of the house and the new.

We took lots of photos when the floor installers were working and so we know they use a paper underlayment on the sub-floor specially made for hardwoods.
We took lots of photos when the floor installers were working and so we know they use a paper underlayment on the sub-floor specially made for hardwoods.

Our downstairs floors are red oak. The kitchen and mud room have already been finished with red oak.

The old dining room floor needs to meet up with and match the conservatory (seen through the opening).
The old dining room floor needs to meet up with and match the conservatory (seen through the opening).

I suppose we’ll use the same flooring in the conservatory which connects to the dining room.

New red oak flooring
New red oak flooring

I’m sure I still have the paperwork which describes exactly the material used in the kitchen.

Our master closet gets flooring before being fitted out with shelves and hanging bars.
Our master closet gets flooring before being fitted out with shelves and hanging bars.

On the other hand, upstairs we only need to cover the master bedroom hall and the closet.

The bedroom floors are pine.
The bedroom floors are pine.

Our original upstairs floors are pine as is the custom in  old houses to put better quality material in the public rooms.

Our main second-floor hallway is pine.
Our main second-floor hallway is pine.

With the help of a friend Charlie and I are planning to lay these new floors ourselves. Perhaps we’ll begin upstairs to improve our skills.

 

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Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

7 thoughts on “Considering the Unfinished Floors”

  1. I was thinking about how to build the inlaid banding I have at lunch yesterday. I think it would be possible today but would definitely be some extra work. I write up exactly how I think it worked. That might be fun to do.

    New floors lock together and are easy to put down as long as you rent the right kind of nailer and you could totally do it. After my grandfather botched a refinishing job, no one in my family treads into that territory anymore though.

    What are you planning on using upstairs? I’ve heard new pine is way softer than the old stuff but if you get reclaimed pine, you need to spring for the stuff that was re-milled to be easy to install like the new stuff.

    1. Many good pointers, Chad. We do have a wonderful salvage emporium here in Baltimore. They have loads of flooring in lots that would finish the upstairs easily. I’ll have to look. The friend who is helping us knows how it is done and even taught his own mother and father who, apparently, did a fine job. With Charlie being a detail person and me seeing the big picture we just might get it together . . . or kill each other. Thanks for the encouragement. Jo

      1. The largest area for us will be the closet most of which will ultimately be covered with cabinetry including the floor so just a strip in the middle will show. The hall is another matter as it leads from the bedroom to the bathroom which we will presumably use multiple times each day. I’m not against glue for this application. Jo

  2. Red oak is beautiful. I think you can do it yourselves. I laid laminate flooring in the upstairs bedroom in my house, and it was easy. You will have a friend who knows what he is doing helping you,so it should be even easier for you.

  3. I love your floors. We are faced with the same issue in my flip house. We plan to sand and refinish the old oak floors but I’m not sure what we are going to put in the new kitchen.

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