Beware Holes in the Roof

In order to secure the ladders on the roof of the porch we had to screw cleats to the roof itself.

We used two by four boards as cleats to support the ladders on the porch roof.
We used two by four boards as cleats to support the ladders on the porch roof.

When we were finished with the painting that necessitate ladders on the roof, the cleats had to be removed.

Side jobs -- like placing and removing cleats -- account for unexpected time delays.
Side jobs — like placing and removing cleats — account for unexpected time delays.

Any nail or screw hole on the roof, even a porch roof, must be filled so that rain and snow don’t infiltrate into the underlayment.

We used this sealant in dark brown to seal the holes under the roof shingles.
We used this sealant in dark brown to seal the holes under the roof shingles.

One by one the boards were removed and the holes were immediately filled with (in our case) brown sealant.

The new roof had been well-laid so prying the shingles up took finessing them with a pry bar and hammer.
The new roof had been well-laid so prying the shingles up took finessing them with a pry bar and hammer.

The roof shingles were gingerly pried up and the sealant was squeezed into hole and the shingle patted back down.

The boards have been removed and the holes sealed.
The boards have been removed and the holes sealed.

The ladders are down, the cleats are removed, the holes are filled and the house is painted.

The 2 12-foot ladders (on the left) have been consolidated once again into a 24-foot extension ladder.
The 2 12-foot ladders (on the left) have been consolidated once again into a 24-foot extension ladder.

AND the 24-foot ladder has been reassembled. Tra la.

Do related side jobs hold you up? Do your side jobs become major obstacles?

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Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

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