Go West, Old Paint

Now that the east face of The Glade is fully painted with “Sandy Hook Gray” it’s time to look at the western face.

The east side of The Glade
The east side of The Glade

We’re saving the white trim painting as a separate project.

The area above the porch roof is difficult to reach.
The area above the porch roof is difficult to reach.

The area most difficult to reach is above the side porch on the west side of the house.  I googled different ways to safely paint above a porch roof and didn’t come up with a definitive answer.

The first 2 by 4 is screwed to the roof on the 4-inch side.
The first 2 by 4 is screwed to the roof on the 4-inch side.

Our carpenter friend told showed us  how to connect a sturdy 2 by 4 cleat to the roof with long screws.  Of course we didn’t want to put holes in our new roof but he said when we remove the 2 by 4 immediately lift the roof shingle with the hole, fill under it with roof sealant, and smooth the shingle back down over the hole. (Do it immediately so as not to forget where the hole actually is.)

A 2 by 4 is screwed into the roof then another board is laid perpendicular to the first and screwed in.
A 2 by 4 is screwed into the roof then another board is laid perpendicular to the first and screwed in.

Then he put another 2 by 4 at right angles to the first to give a secure footing. I told him that his 2-board approach to ladder stabilizers and sawhorses is unique but makes a lot of sense. He told me he’s a big guy and appreciates the added security.

Look how well that works!
Look how well that works!

He and Charlie hoisted the 24-foot extension ladder, which has been reduced to one 12-foot section, onto the porch roof.  To reach the middle area he also placed a cleat that would support our shorter A-frame ladder.

The soffit joint at the peak of the roof has been caulked before painting.
The soffit joint at the peak of the roof has been caulked before painting.

Charlie started at the peak of the roof scraping, caulking, and priming.

The eaves have been scraped and caulked. See the improvement below after primer and paint.
The eaves have been scraped and caulked. See the improvement below after primer and paint.

As I said, normally we would paint the trim as a separate project but in this case, while the ladders are set, it makes sense to do everything.

The fascia and soffit on the left hand side have been painted.
The fascia and soffit on the left hand side have been painted.

I’m pretty sure this ongoing series of house painting posts is encouraging other would-be painters to think twice before they start a similar project. Our goal for the shingles and trim is the end of October this year.

Do you have tall enough ladders to reach all parts of your house?

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Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

14 thoughts on “Go West, Old Paint”

  1. This could almost be called the science and art of painting! Glad you friend is a wise man with a solution. The improvement is impressive.

    1. Thanks, Barbara. Yes, our friend knows all sorts of who-da-thunk solutions. I have the vision and he can see it and make it come true. I might have to start calling him Mr. Disney. As it is I call him the Viking. Jo

    1. Thanks, Valorie. It always helps to know someone who knows something. The right-angle board seemed intelligent but not intuitive, meaning I would never have thought of it. Jo

  2. Have you thought about renting some fall restraint harnesses? I don’t know where you’d attach them, but people get hurt doing this stuff all the time! Glad you carpenter has good solutions. We will be facing these challenges next summer when we paint (long overdue). I don’t think our tall ladder will get us up to the back eave. It’s a long ways up, even on a one-story house!

    1. Not sure, either, where to attach a harness. The chimney sweep uses one at our house but the original roof is really steep. And the painting continues. Jo

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