Rethinking the Interior Door Colors

I had decided to paint all the interior doors the same color: Silver Half Dollar by Benjamin Moore.

Greys, blues, and greens with subtle differences.
Greys, blues, and greens with subtle differences. (Hydrangea is misspelled. Sorry.)

However I had fallen into this color in a wrong way.

We have 5 sets of bare-wood Shaker doors.
We have 5 sets of bare-wood Shaker doors.

I really needed to decide on the stain color for the bare-wood Shaker doors before thinking about the paint color for the painted doors.

The color of stain can be adjusted but it's more finicky than paint.
The color of stain can be adjusted but it’s more finicky than paint.

I went out and bought a quart of Varathane “weathered gray” stain and tried it on a piece of pine.

Weathered gray stained pine next to the kitchen cabinets in Silas Stain.
Weathered gray stained pine next to the kitchen cabinets in Silas Stain.

At that point I realized the “weathered gray” stain would go with the kitchen cabinetry except that it was lighter.

"Secret" is the darker grey on the right -- arrow points to my custom mix. (This is a better indication of the true color of "Secret".)
“Secret” is the darker grey on the right — arrow points to my custom mix. (This is a better indication of the true color of “Secret”.)

Although lighter it was not light, more of a medium tone, which I liked.

Secret and Weathered Gray look good together.
Secret and Weathered Gray look good together.

Then I set out to choose a compatible paint color which turned out to be Benjamin Moore’s “Secret”.

This cabinet is a home-mixed color based on "Secret".
This cabinet is a home-mixed color based on “Secret”.

I had used a home-mixed color very close to this for the bottom of the linen closet and the shelves in my bedroom.

I'm even planning grey doors in the conservatory.
I’m even planning grey doors in the conservatory.

So with a $10 coupon that I must use before the end of the month I bought a gallon of “Secret” in a satin finish to use on the doors.

Weathered grey stain on the mudroom closet should look something like this.
Weathered grey stain on the mudroom closet should look something like this.

I might lighten it a bit (with light grey), or warm it up (with “Sparrow“), or cool it off (with “Hydrangea“) when I actually get going on the painting depending on the actual color of the stain on the Shaker doors.

Are you brave to mix your own colors?

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Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

10 thoughts on “Rethinking the Interior Door Colors”

    1. Ah, so you have done it. I remember mixing about 8 gallons of paint for theatrical scenery from leftover paint from other shows. Then the designer decided he wanted more walls after everything was painted — NO, NO. Impossible to match as you say. Jo

  1. Not brave enough, no! Paint colors are so tricky. They change every hour of the day so it was so hard for me to decide when we were remodeling. I only got one room wrong, which isn’t bad. But won’t have the budget to repaint for a while.

    1. Quantity is always an issue with paint. If I run out I’m careful to have painted on different planes because a change in color is difficult to detect from wall to wall. Jo

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