Drying Burnished Hydrangeas

Blue hydrangeas
Blue hydrangeas
The same blue hydrangea as it changes color at the end of summer.
The same blue hydrangea as it changes color at the end of summer.

I wrote a post 4 years ago about Nikko blue hydrangeas in the yard that change color in autumn.

I would normally out a vase of flowers on the dining room table but for now it is wallpaper central.
I would normally out a vase of flowers on the dining room table but for now it is wallpaper central.

Even though the interior of the house is still “under construction” I decided I needed a little pretty to soothe my sensibility.

The hydrangea bushes are about 3- feet in diameter.
The hydrangea bushes are about 3- feet in diameter.

In the early morning I scanned the 3 (we’ll have more next year) bushes for burnished blossoms.

I love the mottled look of a fall hydrangea as much as the bright blue of the hydrangea in spring.
I love the mottled look of a fall hydrangea as much as the bright blue of the hydrangea in spring.

I cut about 8 or 9 flowering stems.

Love the pale green petals.
Love the pale green petals.

I tied the stems together in 2 bunches with bits of old pantyhose. (Charlie cuts them up to gently hold tomato branches to the trellis.)

I know these will be in the way here in front of the sink but soon they'll be ready for a vase.
I know these will be in the way here in front of the sink but soon they’ll be ready for a vase.

Running out of time before leaving for work, I hung them over my sink to dry. Hanging them upside down keeps the flower heads from drooping.

A single hydrangea blossom
A single hydrangea blossom
Use them one at a time or in bunches.
Use them one at a time or in bunches.

When dried, hydrangeas hang onto the color at the stage in which you pick them so these will be pale green and burnished claret.

I've even used a spring in a cloche.
I’ve even used a sprig in a cloche.

Just something pretty.

How do you soothe your sensibilities? Cleaning? Cooking? Reading? Writing? Music?

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Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

6 thoughts on “Drying Burnished Hydrangeas”

  1. they’re beautiful! if you pick them when they’re blue, they’ll dry blue, too? i didn’t know that about hydrangeas. i’ve never grown any. cleaning, reading or going on a walk works for me.

  2. Hydrangeas seem like the perfect flower for your color scheme. I love their fall colors, too, but I have never dried them. Last year would have been the year to do it–I had lots of blossoms. This year, not nearly as many, probably because it’s been so dry for so long, and I haven’t given the hydrangea much water. Maybe next year!

    1. Thanks, Magali. I’m fairly sure the renovation will never truly be finished. My mother was always changing things around just for the fun of it. I inherited my penchant for tweaking. Jo

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