Tough Week

Just before dawn a few days ago we awakened to bright lightening with loud noise.

Charlie had recently spiffed up the garden by mulching the paths.
Charlie had recently spiffed up the garden by mulching the paths.

It was hailing — hail the size of quarters.  Hailing so hard it set off the motion detectors on our outside flood lights. (Our temperatures in the past week have been in the upper 80s so how we had hail I don’t know.)

The large tree at the center of the picture is dead.
The large tree at the center of the picture is dead.

The violent wind and hail brought down some of the branches on our dead tree that overhangs the garden.

The tomato plants have been knocked over and broken -- this photo is after the clean-up.
The tomato plants have been knocked over and broken — this photo is after the clean-up.

Mature tomato plants and their cages were knocked down.  Charlie cleaned up the devastation as much as possible.

A neighborhood dog carried off one of these hydrangea propagators never to be seen again.
A neighborhood dog carried off one of these hydrangea propagators never to be seen again.

On a brighter note I started a few more hydrangea plants because a neighborhood dog carried off one of my propagators that had 4 plants in it. Same dog (I assume) had removed my paint shoes from the porch.

I took cutting from this blue lace cap hydrangea but left the blossoms in tact.
I took cuttings from this blue lace cap hydrangea but left the blossoms in tact.

These new cuttings are from a blue lace cap hydrangea at work.

The first cuttings planted 2 weeks ago have well-formed roots and have been transplanted.
The first cuttings planted 2 weeks ago have well-formed roots and have been transplanted. (The white blob is ice cubes to gently water the pots.)

Taking careful cuttings does not hurt the plant and allows for an exact replica of the mother plant.

Graduated wood squares cut from various widths of lumber.
Graduated wood squares cut from various widths of lumber.

One last thing: I wanted to nail together the project I started last Saturday and hit my index finger so hard with the hammer it turned blue.  Charlie gave me a hand with the project and the wood split so now I have to cut another piece and paint it.

Have you ever experienced hail in the summer?

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Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

7 thoughts on “Tough Week”

  1. I am so sorry. Have you thought about having the dead tree taken down? Will it miss the cottage if it goes down by itself? It’s not cheap, I know, but then neither is the alternative if it hits a building. I hope your finger is healing and not too sore. The hydrangea cutting looks wonderful. I’m so glad that is working out, aside from the dog issue.

    1. Yes, we have considered taking the tree down. Depending on how it would fall it might take out the cottage or the house or neither. We will have to get it done but the cost is exorbitant. Oddly, trees with foliage seem to have a better chance of falling on their own than the truly dead ones; I guess the foliage acts like a sail in high wind conditions. Another subject: imagine my perplexion when I went out to look at the cuttings and they were gone. I have moved them to the porch which does not seem to be off limits to the dogs either. The propagating is working out great! Thanks for the advice. Jo

  2. So sorry about the damage to your garden! We had to have an 80-ft Douglas fir taken down a couple of years ago because of storm damage. Really made me sad. When I see pictures of it, I realize how much I still miss it … although we are safer without it during storm season.

    1. Running off with the hydrangea cuttings forced me to do a few more. They’re very easy to propagate — the cuttings have grown new roots and new leaves. Jo

  3. OMG Hail! I haven’t experienced hail since I was a teenager, but they often threaten us with warnings of it. So strange. Really too bad about the tomato plants. I hope they bounce back. I love taking cuttings and making new plants.

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