Waterproofing the Shower Pans

A year ago we had Schluter shower pans installed in both the conservatory and master bathrooms.

Conservatory bathroom is ready for waterproofing and tiling.
Conservatory bathroom is ready for waterproofing and tiling.

The plan is to have curbless showers so the subfloor was built up to meet the level of the shower pans. (Our bathroom progress is here.)

The waterproof membrane is like non-woven paper.
The waterproof membrane is like non-woven paper.

Yesterday the team of 2 came back to waterproof these pans with Kerdi by Schluter.

Pre-mixed thinset is used to hold the waterproofing in place.
Pre-mixed thinset is used to hold the waterproofing in place.

First they put down thin set as the adhesive for the Kerdi which is flexible like paper.

Thin set is troweled wherever the Kerdi is going to be applied.
Thin set is troweled wherever the Kerdi is going to be applied.

It went up the wall about 10 inches.

Because the shower pans are beveled toward the drain the edges sat slightly above the floor.
Because the shower pans are beveled toward the drain the edges sat slightly above the floor and needed to be leveled.

Any difference in height between the shower and bathroom floor was leveled with extra thinset.

The difference in levels (most noticed on the right side of the photo) has been leveled out.
The difference in levels (most noticed on the right side of the photo) has been leveled out.

The waterproofing came out into the room about 2 feet since we’re not planning to have curbs on the shower.

I fairly sure the bench in the shower is supposed to be waterproofed.
I’m fairly sure the bench in the shower is supposed to be waterproofed.

A different kind of membrane was supposed to be used to go up and over the seat. When I got home from work the seats had not been finished.  I’ll be contacting the installer because he also has our drains which are not supposed to be installed until the tiling begins.

The conservatory bathroom is much smaller than the master bath.
The conservatory bathroom is much smaller than the master bath.

This must set for at least 24-hours and even then we shouldn’t walk on it since any small hole could ultimately cause a leak.

The master shower waterproofing comes out onto the floor of the bathroom.
The master shower waterproofing comes out onto the floor of the bathroom.

I asked the installer to give us a proposal for the tiling itemized by floor and walls. (We’ve purchased the tile.)

Next step: floor tile.

Have you tiled a room? If so, what is something one should absolutely not forget?

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Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

5 thoughts on “Waterproofing the Shower Pans”

  1. I tiled our bathroom with white subway tiles on the walls and hex tiles on the floor. Where I almost screwed up was covering too much ground when grouting the walls. The grout in those little spaces sets up quickly, and Eric had to help me scrub really hard to polish it before it was too late. Also, make sure you have a good tile-cutting saw–you’ll need it! Good luck!

  2. I agree entirely with D’Arcy! Both tiling projects we did here were almost ruined by overzealous grouting. We knew to wipe the grout off but tried following the instructions to wait 20 minutes before wiping (so as not to add water too early to the setting grout lines). But, for textured tiles (anything with multiple layers of paint or “grain” etc), I’d say wait about 10 minutes and then wipe – 10 more minutes, wipe again – 30 more minutes, wipe again. Use a damp (not too wet) sponge that you clean frequently. A cheese cloth works well for the later wiping. Oh and don’t tile when you’re tired. 🙂 Have fun! – Emme @ Eliza Spelled Backwards

    1. Thanks for the details. Good advice not to tile (or wallpaper) when tired and I would add “in a hurry”. It’s the nuance of these jobs that gets us down. Our carpenter friend can think upside down and backwards. You watch and think “what is he doing” then it all of a sudden it makes sense. Jo

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