Inside the Pool House

Yesterday I showed you the exterior of my private and secure haven at “the office”.

Pool house
Pool house

Inside is a treat as well. Although this is not a place to live I could certainly live here.  Or at least vacation  here. There are 5 rooms-ish: an entrance foyer; a ladies’ changing room with shower, toilet, sinks, and washer/dryer; a men’s changing room with shower, toilet, and sink; a kitchen; and a large living room. I would have to find a place to sleep but I’m sure I could.

The entrance opens onto a tiles vestibule.
The entrance opens onto a tiles vestibule.

The entrance into the foyer is a Dutch door.  Most of the exposed wood in the pool house has been “recycled” into this building which is about 50 years old.

The door on the right is the sports closet holding racquets, balls, etc.
The door on the right is the sports closet holding racquets, balls, etc.

To the right of the door are the dressing rooms.

Men's changing room
Men’s changing room

The men’s room is smaller than that for the ladies.

Changing area for the girls.
Changing area for the girls. (There’s a steep hill just outside the window so curtains are not necessary.)

It only makes sense that our (the ladies’) room is larger.

The toilet and shower are behind the pocket door.
The toilet and shower are behind the pocket door.

In both areas the shower and toilet are separated from the dressing area by a sliding door.

Kitchen in the pool house.
Kitchen in the pool house.

Back out into the foyer across from the front door is a small but fully furnished kitchen.  It’s at that point, due to age, that it needs some refurbishment.

The kitchen viewed from the pass-through into the main room.
The kitchen viewed from the pass-through into the main room. Note the Delft tiles behind the stove.
Variegated blue and grey tiles with grey grout.
Variegated blue and grey tiles with grey grout.

Although I’m not usually a fan of tile top counters because they’re not as easy to clean as their smooth siblings, I do like the dark grout in these moody blue tiles.

Wee children's chars an a couple of tall stools flank the kitchen pass-through opening.
Wee children’s chars an a couple of tall stools flank the kitchen pass-through opening.

The pass-though window of the kitchen may be open or closed by means of some charming doors.

The sofa fills most of the room.
The sofa fills most of the room.

The largest room in the structure has a right-angles sectional sofa.

Looking at the sofa from the pool side of the building -- sliding glass doors behind me.
Looking at the sofa from the pool side of the building — sliding glass doors behind me.

The sofa faces the pool through sliding glass doors on one side.

A bluestone path at the side of the pool house leads to the tennis court.
A bluestone path at the side of the pool house leads to the tennis court.
Down the hill from the pool is a clay surface tennis court.
Down the hill from the pool is a clay surface tennis court.

From the opposite direction it looks down on the tennis court.

The grilling station would be great for s'mores.
The grilling station would be great for s’mores.

Yesterday I showed you a brick grill on the exterior.

This side door leads out to the path to the tennis court.
This side door leads out to the path to the tennis court.

It backs up to a fireplace on the inside.

The Moroccan rug behind the table along with 3 matching ones have recently been removed for cleaning and repair.
The Moroccan rug behind the table along with 3 matching ones have recently been removed for cleaning and repair.

There is also a table for meals or games.

Keeping the colors simple with blue, white and natural wood gives an old world yet summery feeling to the pool house.
Keeping the colors simple with blue, white and natural wood gives an old world yet summery feeling to the pool house.

The floor tile is a calming blue and cream.

Tall paneled ceiling with rustic rafters and a fan to keep the air circulating.
Tall paneled ceiling with rustic rafters and a fan to keep the air circulating.

And the ceiling reflects the same blue amongst the rustic rafters.

The roof is natural cedar shingle allowed to weather.
The roof is natural cedar shingle allowed to weather.

That’s the pool house.

Where are you vacationing this year?

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Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

10 thoughts on “Inside the Pool House”

    1. Me, too. But I’ve come to realize that having something available but not being responsible for the upkeep is a blessing. Jo

      1. I was afraid that would be your reply. That’s ok, if there is one thing that I learned in Costa Rica it is to be happy with what I have. They are happy with a lot less down there!

  1. How old is the pool house? 1970s? I love the wrought iron door hardware! I guess the washer and dryer are in the women’s room because the women are expected to do the laundry, huh? 🙂

    1. Pool house probably built 70s. The woodwork with hardware was found, I think, in a field and shipped here to be used in the construction of pool house. As for the washer/dryer, we have people who do that. Jo

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