Hydrangea Cuttings

I have been dreaming of a hydrangea hedge around the east side of the house for a long time.

Wall of hydrangea via Pinterest
Wall of hydrangea via Pinterest — this is my dream.

When we moved the 3 bushes in 2012 to make room for the renovation I always had the intention to put them back  (which we did) and abundantly grow Nikko blue hydrangeas along the east side of the house.

A cutting to use for rooting should not be from a flowering stem and should bee green, not woody.
A cutting to use for rooting should not be from a flowering stem and should be green, not woody.

Now seems the perfect time to clip some stems and transplant them.  I gave Charlie a hint about this a couple of weeks ago but Charlie only deals in edibles so I decided to try it myself.

A small bag of vermiculite costs about $5.
A small bag of vermiculite costs about $5.
A small jar of rooting hormone will last a long time.
A small jar of rooting hormone will last a long time.

Using the instructions here I purchased some vermiculite and rooting hormone.

I measured and found my cuttings were about 10 inches long so I cut them down to the requisite 6 inches.
I measured and found my cuttings were about 10 inches long so I cut them down to the requisite 6 inches.

I cut 6-inch stems from our 3 healthy plants and stripped the bottom leaves.

Rooting hormone clings to the stem.
Rooting hormone clings to the stem.
Damp vermiculite will hold the stems upright.
Damp vermiculite will hold the stems upright.

I dipped the stems in rooting hormone and plugged them into damp vermiculite.

The large hydrangea leaves can be cut down.
The large hydrangea leaves can be cut down.

I trimmed the remaining leaves to about half their size so the plant can put its energy into rooting and not keeping large leaves alive.

The plastic bag should keep the moisture in but I'll check in a day or two to see how it's doing.
The plastic bag should keep the moisture in but I’ll check in a day or two to see how it’s doing.

I covered the entire pot with clear plastic and put it in the by the foundation near the hydrangea bushes.

The paint drying rack on the east side of the house is a good spot for the rooting hydrangeas.
The paint drying rack on the east side of the house is a good spot for the rooting hydrangeas.

I’m hoping to transplant them either this fall or next spring.

Do you propagate plants?

Advertisements

Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

5 thoughts on “Hydrangea Cuttings”

  1. Good luck with your cuttings. I couldn’t tell from your picture but make sure those bottom leaf nodes (where the leaves were cut off) are in the vermiculite. Just snip off some of the plain stem to shorten it up so the node is in the rooting medium. I had a hydrangea clipping root just by sticking it in old potting soil after I did some repotting. I kept the old soil to dump on the compost but ended up sticking clippings of several different things in the old soil and most of the clippings rooted.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s