Good and Not So Good

The title of this post is the answer to the question: How are the olive trees doing?

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One Koroneiki (Greek) and two Arbequina (Spanish) varieties to grow in Maryland (Zone 7 near the coast). This is how they looked when we first purchased them.

As you recall we bought 3 small olive trees in Florida about his time of year back in 2013.

One Koroneiki (Greek) in the middle is doing better than the two Arbequina (Spanish) varieties.
One Koroneiki (Greek) in the middle is doing better than the two Arbequina (Spanish) varieties. (April, 2015)

Each year we’ve brought them in for the winter. Inside they lose leaves and get spindly.

I pruned them mercilessly this year.
I pruned them mercilessly this year.

This year I decided I’d like them to have a less sprawling look; more of a topiary style. The advice from the grower was: Prune the lower branches and shape your tree. Olive trees bear their fruit on one year old wood. To promote this growth, prune your trees in spring. You can pinch the branches of new trees or prune back branches of established trees. Olive trees won’t bear fruit twice on the same wood, so remove bearing shoots from the previous year each spring. Don’t prune your tree in the first two years.

2013
2013

That worked great with the Greek Koroneiki olive tree.

The Koroneiki Greek olive tree in its new pot.
The Koroneiki Greek olive tree in its new pot. 2015

It has been transplanted and is doing well.

Olive trees need lots of sun.
Olive trees need lots of sun.

The other two Spanish Arbequina olive trees, however, are leafing out a bit but have taken the transition from Florida to Maryland very hard.

I'm giving the Spanish olive trees more time.
I’m giving the Spanish olive trees more time.

I’m hoping these few leaves on each of the newly transplanted trees will help them to grow with vigor.

I'm not expecting olives this year but I think the tree will eventually get the lollipop shape I desire.
I’m not expecting olives this year but I think the tree will eventually get the lollipop shape I desire.

I’m going to let them get accustomed to their new pots and fertilize them to promote wood growth.

This tree suffered the most but is actually leafing out along the (only living?) branch.
This tree suffered the most but is actually leafing out along the (only living?) branch.

No fertilizing after October.

When do you give up on plants that are not growing well?

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Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

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