Always an Alteration

I finally found the shelf I wanted for the conservatory closet at Home Depot. (They had just received a new shipment.)

The conservatory closet drywalled and painted.
The conservatory closet, drywalled and painted, needs a shelf.

I needed a piece 91 inches long. Since they only come in 12-foot sections it needed to be cut down. (I had to buy the entire 12-foot piece.)

This monster of a bolt cutter really did the job of cutting wire shelving down to size.
This monster of a bolt cutter really did the job of cutting wire shelving down to size.

I was assisted at the store by a customer service rep who used a pneumatic bolt cutter to cut the shelving.  She took it off the rack, measured it to my specifications, cut it, and helped me to the cash register. Truly the best service I’ve ever had at Home Depot.

I often mark a drill bit with tape so I don't have to worry about going in too deep.
I often mark a drill bit with tape so I don’t have to worry about going in too deep.

I  marked the drill bit with tape so it wouldn’t go into the wall too deep and hit something like ductwork that I know is in this particular wall.

A level pencil line is marked along the back of the closet 70 inches from the sub-floor.
A level pencil line is marked along the back of the closet 70 inches from the sub-floor.

Once home I marked the inside of the closet with a long level line and drilled 1/4-inch holes for the wall plugs which are built into the back clips.

The clips/plugs were easy to install.
The clips/plugs were easy to install.

These should not be more than 12 inches apart. Mine were 11.

We had to drill a deeper hole and use a screw to install a clip that has a stud behind it.
We had to drill a deeper hole and use a screw to install a clip that has a stud behind it.

The only one that gave me any trouble was the left end which went into a stud.  The plastic plug buckled a little making it difficult to push in the nail.  Instead I found a similar sized screw and Charlie screwed it in.

It takes a good bit of pressure on the hammer handle to push the nails into place.
It takes a good bit of pressure on the hammer handle to push the nails into place.

The other brackets are held with a nail/pin that just gets pushed in with the handle end of a hammer.

The back clips hold the shelf in place, either up or down, while the front brackets are installed.
The back clips hold the shelf in place, either up or down, while the front brackets are installed.

I hooked the shelf onto the brackets and measured for the front-end brackets.

We had to poke a hole in the dryer duct to get the bracket to support the front of the shelf which we hope is self sealing when the screw is in.
We had to poke a hole in the dryer duct to get the bracket to support the front of the shelf which we hope is self sealing when the screw is in.

Notice that the one on the left wall is lined up with the dryer exhaust duct.  We had to drive a screw into this, too.

Combination of the pin that came with the bracket on the left and a random screw from our hardware box holds up the end of the shelf.
Combination of the pin that came with the bracket on the left and a random screw from our hardware box holds up the end of the shelf.

If we ever decided to actually put a washer and dryer in this closet the shelf will need to be shortened.

The right price but the wrong descriptive picture and the wrong information (bracket size) on the label.
The right price but the wrong descriptive picture and the wrong information (bracket size) on the label. Thanks for the confusion, Home Depot.

I had purchased 16-inch brackets for this 16-inch shelf but since it has a hanging rail at 12 inches it only needs 12-inch brackets.

I returned two 16-inch brackets for a two-pack of 12-inch brackets.
I returned two 16-inch brackets for a two-pack of 12-inch brackets.

Back to Home Depot for an exchange.

Next the doors.
Next the doors.

The shelf is totally up and ready for use.

Next item: Put the doors on the closet.

What’s next on your list?

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Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

3 thoughts on “Always an Alteration”

  1. The actual installation didn’t take as long as the 5 trips to Home Depot and Lowes. But you know I sang “ta daaahhh” when I pushed in the last pin. Jo

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