90% Preliminary Fail

I said I was going to cover our old roller shades with greige canvass fabric I have on hand.

This fabric is the perfect color with strands of grey crossing strands of natural colored canvass but it seems too stiff for curtains, perfect for shades.
This fabric is the perfect color with strands of grey crossing strands of natural colored canvass but it seems too stiff for curtains, perfect for shades.

For some reason I couldn’t get started on the project yesterday morning even though I was up bright and early.

I have plenty of space in the dining room for a spread-out project.
I have plenty of space in the dining room for a spread-out project.

Finally after enlarging the dining room table with a 2-foot leaf, dragging the big ironing board down to the dining room, and carrying my sewing machine from the laundry room I was ready to get started.

These windows need shades and curtains.
These windows need shades and curtains.

Our windows are approximately 54 inches long and the fabric is 59 inches wide so the top and bottom would have selvage edges.

The black plastic was supposed to contain any spray adhesive that missed its mark.
The black plastic was supposed to contain any spray adhesive that missed its mark.

I laid black plastic on the table because the plan was to use spray adhesive to hold the fabric to the shade until I could sew the edges. (At one point I wanted to add a little more spray adhesive — unfortunately I picked up the charcoal spray paint by mistake. Grrgh!)

Allow an inch for turning back the edges.
Allow an inch for turning back the edges.

Everything was going along as planned. I pressed the fabric and finger-pressed the 1-inch return around the shade on the long edges.

Other than the bulkiness this is not a difficult sewing chore.
Other than the bulkiness this is not a difficult sewing chore.

Then I sewed the edges of the shade with the wrapped fabric.

The bulkiness of the canvass fabric caused the shade to buckle.
The bulkiness of the canvass fabric caused the shade to buckle.

I rolled the shade back around the roller; it was rough but would work. I put up some hanging hardware in the front window which would allow the shade to hang without the roller showing — backwards from the typical installation.

The color of the shade doesn't look much different from when it was not covered.
The color of the shade doesn’t look much different from when it was not covered.

ICK! With light coming through the window the shade still had a creamy yellowish tint.  The reason for covering the shade in the first place was to get rid of the yellow.

The bare shade roller is metal.
The bare shade roller is metal.

I ripped the fabric off the shade, resewed the edges of the fabric, removed the original shade from the roller, and taped the fabric right to the roller with masking tape.

Wide masking tape holds the fabric to the roller.
Wide masking tape holds the fabric to the roller.

I just wanted to see what it would look like in the window.

Difficult to get a good photo of the color but the yellow is gone.
Difficult to get a good photo of the color but the yellow is gone.

And it doesn’t look bad.

I sewed in a 4-inch hem and inserted the original shade's stiffening stick.
I sewed in a 4-inch hem and inserted the original shade’s stiffening stick.

I only had the energy for one shade today and I do need to pull out the thread from the erroneous stitching but I think this will work. And I’m still making curtains also.

You haven't heard the last about this project.
You haven’t heard the last about this project.

Five more to make.  I’m wondering if the situation will be different on a black-out shade. Maybe tomorrow.

How did your weekend project fare?

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Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

6 thoughts on “90% Preliminary Fail”

  1. I actually really like the filtered-light look–very nice! I hope the rest of them go smoothly … seems like a great solution! I would worry about the masking tape eventually drying up and coming loose, though. Duct tape?

  2. I would skip the light blocking fabric and just keep on with what you now have. It looks great with the light filtering through. The masking tape will last for quite a while since you are not putting the shades up and down.

    1. Thanks, Karin. I was only thinking of the light-blocking shade for the bedroom but since there are also French doors (in the bedroom) with an eastern exposure one north-facing window won’t make much difference. Jo

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