Salvaged Wood Planter

I showed you my newly made planter yesterday.

This planter box is totally made from salvaged wood.
This planter box is totally made from salvaged wood.

Now for the step by step.

My not-to-scale sketch of the plans.
My not-to-scale sketch of the plans.

First we laid out some old fence wood that had been rotting in the wood pile.

I even used some old stakes Charlie had cut from a salvaged fence.
I even used some old stakes Charlie had cut from a salvaged fence.

Generally following Ana White’s plans for a cedar planter I cut 1 by 6s (actually 5.5 inches wide) into 18 inch long pieces.  Cut 12 (3 each for 4 sides).

1 by 6s cut to 18 inches. (3 are pictured here side by side.)
1 by 6s cut to 18 inches. (3 are pictured here side by side.)

Then I attached these pieces from the back with screws to 18-inch-long 1 by 3s top and bottom making 4 panels.

The top and bottom rails are screwed from behind.
The top and bottom rails are screwed from behind.

To each panel I attached 22-inch-long 1 by 3 stiles with 1-1/4 inch pocket screws (2 screws at the top rail and 2 at the bottom). (This is where the plan deviates from Ana’s.  She uses 2 by 2s as stiles/legs.) Be sure to make 4 left side legs and 4 right side legs.  I unfortunately forgot this detail so needed to redrill one of the legs.  The funny thing is I should have needed to redrill FOUR legs. Hmmmm!

Make 8 legs -- 4 l4ft side and 4 right side.
Make 8 legs — 4 left side and 4 right side.

I screwed the four panels along the edges to make a box.

I used a utility stool to support the legs until they were attached together.
I used a utility stool to support the sides until they were attached together.

Once the sides were secure I added a piece of wood 12 inches from the top to the inside of 2 opposite panels to hold the bottom of the planter.  This measurement is totally dependent upon what you decide to use the planter for.  I’m putting in a large pot but it can also be shorter if you are actually adding dirt and planting something or if you’re using smaller pots.

The cleat is screwed inside 2 opposite sides of the planter.
The cleat is screwed inside 2 opposite sides of the planter.

I laid 2 by 4s across the bottom of the planter on the cleats.

Any scrap wood can create the bottom of the planter.
Any scrap wood can create the bottom of the planter.

The most difficult part was putting a mitered sill on the top edge of the planter which was only difficult because the lumber was not in standard widths. I screwed the sill down which makes carrying it a little easier even though it’s heavy. (This, too, is a deviation from the original plan.)

Ooooooh, mitered corners.
Ooooooh, mitered corners.

Then I tried a variety of plants and pot sizes.

After I tried a boxwood (which was waaay toooo small) I tried an olive tree which looked pretty good.
After I tried a boxwood (which was waaay toooo small) I tried an olive tree which looked pretty good.

Finally liked the gardenia by the front door best.

The gardenia is a good size for this planter which is ultimately 22 inches by 22 inches.
The gardenia is a good size for this planter which is ultimately 22 inches by 22 inches.

Charlie really likes this planter.  It’s rustic and masculine.

A rustic planter made from salvaged wood.  FREE!
A rustic planter made from salvaged wood. FREE!

I’ve decided to make 2 more in a 2/3 size version with purchased wood (since the salvage is mostly used up)  for the boxwood at the front of the potager.

Have you built anything? Did you change the plans?
I linked this to
Ana White - making a home with handmade furniture and other DIY projects

Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

2 thoughts on “Salvaged Wood Planter”

  1. I definitely like this plan. My husband built planter boxes from salvaged slats from our old privacy fence a few years ago.

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