The Wee Little House Design

Over 10 years ago a 150-year-old oak tree fell on our shed.  It was demolished. That gave me the opportunity to design a one-of-a-kind shed to meet our needs.

The Wee Little House

The footprint and location had to remain the same as the one that fell so we wouldn’t neeed any building permits or inspectors.

I started looking at lots of pictures.  This one seemed very nicely designed as well as utilitarian. I’m pretty sure I found it in Sheds: The Do-It-Yourself Guide for Backyard Builders by David Stiles which is in our public library.

I loved this design.

I flipped the design so it would fit better into our terrain. The window would have a southern exposure. (When I first drew up the plans for this design I flipped it by holding the paper up to light and tracing the picture on the back of the same sheet.)

Basic design for the shed at The Glade.

I hired a carpenter and his grown son to build the shed which they did from this drawing. I wanted to use an old door that we had around the place.

The carpenter installed this vintage door on the front of the shed.

We also had an old window probably from a 1940’s storm door. The carpenter installed it horizontally.

The window opens out from the bottom.

I knew I wanted two sides: the dirty side for mowers, garden tools and gear. The equipment storage side is totally separate from the side entered by the blue door.  The storage side has large sliding double barn doors which allow just about any equipment to be easily put away.

Sliding barn doors

And the clean side: a nice place for small projects, planting, storing tools, lawn furniture and boating equipment.

Through the door

The shed in the book also pictured a potting bench.

I really liked the idea of a permanent potting/work bench in the shed.

I wanted one extra feature.  (This next part will give you some insight into just how crazy I am.) I had been saving a cast iron enamelled kitchen sink with drain board from my first house.  When we remodeled the kitchen in the previous house circa 1990 the sink was replaced with a more modern one.  I saved, moved and lugged this  sink  to The Glade thinking I might just be able to use it someday.

The sink is installed in the middle of the counter which runs the length of the shed.

Our carpenter not only installed the sink but made a wooden covering for it in case we wanted to use the bench as an entire flat surface.

Now we have a lovely shed which we call the Wee Little House that might be better built than any other structure on the property.

Do you have outbuildings? Do you love them? Or are they a shambles?

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Author: Jo

Welcome to The Glade, where the second generation of renovations has just begun and the mania about our home, music and other passions fill our days and nights. We’re Charlie and Jo in the music world; Mary Jo and Charles to family; and JoJo and Charlie to each other. We are renovating a midcentury house in a Victorian historic district where we want to live there the rest of our lives. It's a 1946 house located in Maryland. We were married in this house. Thus far (pre-blog) we refinished cabinets, added a window seat (still working on the cushion), rearranged a wall in the guest house due to sink/vanity replacement, planted a vegetable garden, and other quick and not-so-quick fixes. So this latest zeal for construction is the result of my having lived here since 1997 and feeling a need to ready the house for the next chapter and beyond.

1 thought on “The Wee Little House Design”

  1. Love your new shed… looks like a cozy cottage! Thanks for visiting me at A Season for All Things. I’m your newest follower and look forward to reading more of your posts. ~ Ellen

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